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classeS  

publications

 

UW-LaCrosse - Fall 2016:
Social Problems

Sociology 120
Tuesday and Thursday 11:00am – 12:25pm
Room: Centennial 3101

Course Description

 

 

UW-LaCrosse - Fall 2016:
Deliquency

Sociology 322
Tuesday and Thursday 12:40PM - 2:05PM
Room: Wimberly 340

Course Description

 

 

UW-LaCrosse - Fall 2016:
Sociology of City Life

Sociology 319
Tuesday: 6:00PM-8:45PM
Room: Wimberly 340

Course Description

 

 

Getting the Holy Ghost

Getting the Holy Ghost

available now

GETTING THE HOLY GHOST Urban Ethnography in a Brooklyn Pentecostal Tongue-Speaking Church

Read the reviews: PentecoStudies
Contemporary SociologyPneuma
Religious Studies Review

Paperback Available now!

Lexington Books

Amazon

Barnes&Noble

More about the book>>

 

RELATED PAPER
Becoming a God hunter towards conversion in a Brooklyn tongue-speaking church.
in Social Compass, a Sage publication.

UPCOMING BOOKs  

IN THE NEWS

 

Chasing Religion Book Cover

 

Down & Out Book Cover

 

Available now!

Amazon

Photos from my fieldwork and research on religion and culture in the Caribbean can be found HERE. Links to filmed exorcisms are here and here and voodoo ceremonies are here and here.

Endorsements are here.

 

Down and Out in New Orleans: Notes from the Urban Underbelly is based on extensive ethnographic research involving living and working on the urban fringes of the postindustrial, tourist-intensive economy of New Orleans.

RELATED PAPER
"Buskers of New Orleans: Transgressive Sociology in the Urban Underbelly" in Journal of Contemporary Ethnography

The Social Problems Field Research Workbook takes the student beyond the academic classroom and into the community to explore social problems first hand using a variety of sociological methods. Students learn to develop a relationship between the classroom and real world situations bridging the gap between the abstract world of theory and the everyday life of people and their institutions. The purpose is to understand social problems through developing the sociological imagination to distinguish between personal troubles and structural issues as they play out in the late-modern social world. (Expected 2017)

ETHNOGRAPHIES OF RELIGION

A NEW SERIES FROM LEXINGTON BOOKS

SERIES EDITOR
Peter Marina, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse

ADVISORY BOARD
Michael Wilkinson, Stephen Glazier,
Carlos Hernández, Margaret Paloma,
Donna Bowman, & Jill Krebs

Download the PDF here

Presenting Papers At:

 

     
NOV
16-19
 

Down and Out in New Orleans: Notes from the Urban Underbelly
November 16-19, 2016 in New Orleans, LA at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside
Chairing panel: "Transgressive Sociololgy" with David Brotherton and Jane Mooney
The American Society of Criminology

 

 

Peter Marina: Broken-windows policing is failed policy
Lacrosse Tribune, Nov. 4, 2015

A review of "Getting the Holy Ghost" in the Pneuma Review, Journal of Ministry Resources and Theology for Pentecostal and Charismatic Ministries & Leaders.

Peter Marina: County's juvenile arrest rate hurting our kids
Lacrosse Tribune, April 26, 2015

Peter Marina: Hispanic community strengthens region
Lacrosse Tribune, October 8, 2014

LPC RESEARCH FELLOW 2014-2016
The Latino Protestant Congregations (LPC) Project
The Latino Protestant Congregations (LPC) Project includes a team of ten researchers conducting qualitative observations and interviews in Latino Protestant churches across the United States.

PETER MARINA TELLS OF HIS ADVENTURES IN
PENTECOSTALISM AND TONGUE-SPEAKING

16 May 2012
Riverfront Times

SOCIOLOGY UNDERGRADUATES GET A CHANCE TO GET DIRTY
10 November 2011
UMSL Daily

MEET SOCIOLOGIST PETER MARINA
16 November 2011
UMSL Daily

IMPORTANT LINKS  

office info


PAST CLASSES & SYLLABI

SIDE PROJECT Sociology primer presented in
graphic novel form: Huppy the Anarchist

LINKS PAGE

Information on Frac Sand Mining

 


ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

Department of Sociology
437K Wimberly Hall
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
La Crosse, WI 54601
Phone: (608) 785 6770
Fax: (608) 785-8486
E-mail: pmarina@uwlax.edu

Office Hours: 2:10-3:10pm Tuesday and Thursday or by appointment

     


2014-2016 © Peter Marina. All images and documents are original and copyrighted.
Please email me if you have any questions. Hosted by EMWD.
 

 

 

this is a test, this is only a test

Getting the Holy Ghost. Urban Ethnography in
a Brooklyn Pentecostal
Tongue-Speaking Church
  As America finds itself embroiled in constant debate over religion, secularization and political difference–and as spiritually fueled tongue-speaking charismatic churches spread exponentially across the United States, challenging many mainstream ideas, particularly in big-city ghettos–this manuscript titled Getting the Holy Ghost: Experiences in an American Tongue-Speaking Church focuses on Pentecostalism in late modernity. The book carries an ethnographic signature in approach and style, concerning an examination of a large Brooklyn, New York African American community Pentecostal church congregation and is based on a unique set of data: dozens of ethnographic notes taken over the course of almost four years in New York City. It's an ethnography, but a unique one, built on participant observation of a Pentecostal church that is known to outsiders almost exclusively for its members'; “bizarre” habit of speaking in tongues. Getting the Holy Ghost, however, puts those outsiders inside the church pews, as it paints a portrait of piety, compassion, caring, love — all embraced through an embodiment perspective, as the church's members experience these forces in the most personal ways through religious conversion. My book concerns the notion of “spectacle” because of the grand bodily display that is highlighted by spiritual struggle, social aspiration, punishment and spontaneous explosion of a variety of emotions in the public sphere. This work is an inspiring construct that provides both an historical and theoretical overview of the sociological work on religion, race, gender, post-modernity and the Weberian concept of charisma as central analytical frames.
   
Originally published March 2013; New paperback edition published – October 31, 2014: Lexington Book  

 

(Expected 2016)

Chasing religion in the caribbean: ethnographic journeys from antigua to trinidad

  I have been traveling to the Caribbean conducting ethnographic research with religious leaders on how Charismatic Christianity crosses borders throughout the region. Looking specifically at the types of trans-border relationships that develop between charismatic religions in the United States and throughout the Caribbean, this project extends the original ideas from my first book and takes them to the Caribbean to show how the vitality of charisma in Charismatic churches depends largely on the form that transnationalization of religion takes between and among nation-states. The argument is that the form transnationalism takes in the region has profound implications for the political, cultural, economic, and social landscape of the region. I collected large amounts of ethnographic data with religious leaders from prosperous mega-churches, small storefront pastors, government leaders, economic leaders on imports/exports, and many other people affiliated with the Charismatic Evangelical scene. I also conducted radio interviews with a popular religious radio station that broadcasts throughout the Caribbean called Abundant Life Radio, delivered talks in front of large mega churches at the behest of pastors who have given me full access for the research, and video and audio recorded numerous exorcisms throughout my research travels. The proposed book also discusses the blending of Voodoo, Obeah, and Charismatic Christianity to produce interesting religious practices in the region as well as dramatic scenes showcasing these practices. I received $10,000 grant to live and travel throughout the Caribbean this summer to complete the fieldwork for this project.
   
Funded. Research to be completed by Fall 2014.  

 

(Expected 2017)

Down and Out in New Orleans: notes from the urban Underbelly
  This book reproduces the conditions of Orwell’s exploits while downtrodden in late 1920s Paris to tell the story of post-millennium New Orleans and its culture of creative degenerates, vagabonds, artists, hustlers, low-lifes, transients, grifters, intellectuals, musicians, druggies, skells, writers, gutter punks, goths, nihilists, and existentialists who exist beneath the radar in the city of New Orleans.

Over eighty years have passed since George Orwell wrote his seminal book Down and Out in Paris and London, which intimately described the experiences of poverty in the great modern metropolis of his time. While literary critic and philosopher Walter Benjamin depicted 1920’s Parisian social life within the great arcades of the metropolis as a flâneur strolling through local life to experience the city as a connoisseur of the street, Orwell lived and worked, at times down and at other times out, in the urban underbelly beneath the iron and glass covered arcades. The inter-war period of Paris during Benjamin and Orwell’s writing attracted a creative community of bohemian artists and intellectuals who frequented coffee shops and participated in lively nightlife. Beneath the surface world of Benjamin’s bourgeoisie Paris, Orwell depicted life on the fringes of Paris’s Latin Quarter as he subsisted standing in breadlines, working lowly restaurant jobs as a plongeur experiencing near destitution, and traversing the unseen and often hidden spaces of the city. Meanwhile, many artists and intellectuals also arrived in New Orleans during this same roaring 1920’s period, making New Orleans – the cradle of jazz – the Paris-on-the-Mississippi.

Fast-forward a century, to post-Katrina New Orleans, as it attracts a flow of modern bohemian transplants, all migrating to the city to become part of its distinct culture in a search for cultural authenticity, artistic expression, self-actualization, identity transformation, and alternative lifestyles. And, just as in 1920’s Paris, beneath this bohemian surface lives a huge urban and mostly unacknowledged class of willful outsiders in New Orleans, people who exist on the edges in the post-industrial tourist economy. Borrowing a page from Orwell, we will pull back the veil to reveal the less-seen spaces of New Orleans, intimately depicting the social life of the new creative urban dweller living at and near poverty. Revealing life in the underbelly of New Orleans requires moving beyond standard sociological methodology, rather, the methodology is part of the whole book: I will not merely study the city’s fringes. I will be living on them. I won’t merely be interviewing the city’s new bohemians. I will live among them, live as one of them. I won’t settle for examining the city’s modern underbelly. I will creep and crawl through it myself – sometimes on my hands and knees, working menial jobs, scrounging for enough to eat, living in the urban tribes, and hoping to survive.

   

Research to be completed by Fall 2015.

(Under review with Columbia University Press)

 

 

(Expected 2017)

Social Problems: Field Research Workbook.

  This workbook takes the student beyond the academic classroom and into the community to explore social problems first hand using a variety of sociological methods. Students learn to develop a relationship between the classroom and real world situations bridging the gap between the abstract world of theory and the everyday life of people and their institutions. The purpose is to understand social problems through developing the sociological imagination to distinguish between personal troubles and structural issues as they play out in the late-modern social world.
   
Under Contract with Kendall Hunt Publishing:
ISBN 978-1-4652-9585-9
 

 

 

 

EVALUATIONS

 

 

JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE

faculty - recommendation
observation - spring 2010
teaching evaluation, fall 2010
student - spring 2010
student - fall 2010

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI - ST. LOUIS

Spring 2011-Spring 2012

UNIVERSITY OF NEW ORLEANS

Summer 2013

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - LA CROSSE

Fall 2013 - I
Fall 2013 - II
Spring 2014

 

 

 

   
CV   Download PDF

 

 

   
EDUCATION  

Ph.D., Sociology 2010
New School for Social Research, New York, New York

M.A., Sociology 2004
University of New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana

B.A., Education 1999
University of New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana

 

 

   
TEACHING  
 
UNIVERSITY  

Fall 2013–Current
Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin – La Crosse

Courses: Social Problems (120); Sociological Foundations (200); Sociology of City Life (319); Delinquency (321); Criminology (322); Qualitative Explorations (416)

Summer 2015
Visiting Research Scholar. University of New Orleans
Research on Crime, Culture, and Resistance in New Orleanss

Summer 2013
Visiting Summer Lecturer, University of New Orleans

Course: Criminology (4921)

2011–2013
Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Missouri at St. Louis

Courses: Urban Sociology (3202); Sociology of Conflict (3268); Current Issues in Anthropology (3291); Power, Ideology, and Social Movements (4316); Qualitative Methods in Social Research (4331); Problems in Urban Community (4344); Ethnic and Minority Relations (4360); Sociological Writing (4365); Masculinities (4600); Special Topics In Women's and Gender Studies (5450); Independent Studies (4350)

2010–2011
Adjunct Professor, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY

Courses: Introductory Sociology (1000), Sociology of Deviance (1010)

2009–2010
Adjunct Professor, Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY

Courses: Sociology of the Family (1040)

     
   

 

 
     
RESEARCH INTERESTS   Sociology of the City, Sociology of Religion, Urban Sociology, Cultural Criminology, Youth Resistant Subcultures, Race and Ethnicity, among other topics.

 

 

 

   
     
   

   

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     
   

 

 

     
     

 

 

 

   
     
   

 

     
   

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

     
   

 

     
   

 

     
   

 

 

     
     
     
     

 

 

   
     
     
     
     
   
 

 

 

ABOUT

Peter Marina holds a PhD from the New School for Social Research in New York City and currently teaches sociology at the University of Wisconsin –La Crosse. A native of New Orleans, he received his BA in Education and MA in Sociology at the University of New Orleans. While living in Brooklyn, Peter served as a lecturer at John Jay College of Criminal Justice (CUNY). Peter is an urban sociologist using the tools of ethnography to examine various aspects of the city, including the intersection of race/class/gender/ethnicity, religion in late-modernity, youth resistant subcultures, police culture and practices, Latina/o immigration and urban revitalization (in the New York metropolitan area), and community-based social movements—all with implications for action research. His book Getting the Holy Ghost: Urban Ethnography in a Brooklyn Tongue-speaking Pentecostal Church (Lexington Books: Press release February 1, 2013) focuses on African-American urban religion in late modernity. While at UMSL, Peter taught a variety of undergraduate and graduate classes including urban sociology, problems in urban community, social movements, sociology of minority groups, masculinities, gender studies, qualitative social research, sociological writing/reporting, and sociology of conflict.

Peter's approach to sociology incorporates the striking dialectic of history and biography, allowing him to penetrate and interact with a range of culturally diverse social groups in his career—from public high school youth, to inner-city street kids, to urban Latino/a immigrants, to religiously inspired residents of the inner-city, and more recently, to police officers – in a quest to make sense both empirically and theoretically of this rapidly changing, reflexive, surprising and highly contradictory late-modern world.

Peter's first book (Lexington Books, February 2013) Getting the Holy Ghost: Urban Ethnography in a Brooklyn Pentecostal Tongue-Speaking Church carries an ethnographic signature in approach and style concerning an examination of a large Brooklyn, New York African American community church congregation based on a unique set of data: dozens of ethnographic notes taken over the course of almost four years in New York City. Getting the Holy Ghost puts outsiders inside the church pews, as it paints a portrait of piety, compassion, caring, love—all embraced through an embodiment perspective, as the church's members experience these forces in the most personal ways through religious conversion. The book concerns the notion of “spectacle” because of the grand bodily display which is highlighted by spiritual struggle, social aspiration, punishment and spontaneous explosion of a variety of emotions in the public sphere. This work is an inspiring construct that provides both an historical and theoretical overview of the sociological work on religion, race, gender, post modernity and the Weberian concept of charisma as central analytical frames.

Peter is currently working on numerous articles that include urban youth community resistance in St. Louis, police cultures and practices in the New Orleans Police Department, and Latina/o immigration and urban revitalization (with David Gladstone) in the New York metropolitan area, and other articles on religion in late-modernity. Finally, Peter has been described by the famous cultural criminologist, Jock Young, as “delightfully insane,” a compliment he greatly appreciates.

 

Click on image for 5x7, 300 dpi photo.

Peter Marina

Peter Marina

Peter Marina

Peter Marina

   
   
 
 

 

 

synopsis

 

 

This book carries an ethnographic signature in approach and style, and is an examination of a small Brooklyn, New York, African-American, Pentecostal church congregation and is based on ethnographic notes taken over the course of four years. The Pentecostal Church is known to outsiders almost exclusively for its members' “bizarre” habit of speaking in tongues. This ethnography, however, puts those outsiders inside the church pews, as it paints a portrait of piety, compassion, caring, love—all embraced through an embodiment perspective, as the church's members experience these forces in the most personal ways through religious conversion. Central themes include concerns with the notion of “spectacle” because of the grand bodily display that is highlighted by spiritual struggle, social aspiration, punishment and spontaneous explosions of a variety of emotions in the public sphere. The approach to sociology throughout this work incorporates the striking dialectic of history and biography to penetrate and interact with religiously inspired residents of the inner-city in a quest to make sense both empirically and theoretically of this rapidly changing, surprising and highly contradictory late-modern church scene.
  reviews

 

 


'Getting the Holy Ghost ' is a marvellous ethnography which takes us to the hidden places and strange raptures of Pentecostalism, the largest Christian movement in the world today. Peter Marina has a fine eye for both physical and social detail: he writes like a dream and his text springs to life. In places it reads like a film script. You feel you are there amongst the dancers, the singers, the people speaking in tongues and you share both his attraction and disquiet for this movement to reclaim the supernatural from the cold rationality of conventional religion.'

Jock Young, Distinguished Professor,
City University of New York,
author of The Vertigo of Late Modernity


Getting the Holy Ghost is a skillfully researched account of a small African/Caribbean Pentecostal congregation in Brooklyn, N.Y. Framing the work with sociological theories on Pentecostalism and religious conversion—some supported, others modified and still others rejected—Peter Marina narrates a delightful story through his use of rich interview data and personal observation. His account points to the importance of considering the role emotion plays in the growth of Pentecostalism, a global movement launched over 100 years ago with a host of paranormal experiences, including “tongue-speaking.” Marina&#039;s analysis of how this small congregation balances charisma with institution in an age when spirituality increasingly challenges religious bureaucracy will be of interest not only to Pentecostal scholars but to all serious students of religion.

Margaret A. Poloma, University of Akron,
author of Assemblies Of God At Crossroads:
Charisma Institutional Dilemmas


Peter Marina presents a rare portrait of religious rites in a small community church in Brooklyn, New York. Marina&#039;s skillful use of qualitative data based on first hand accounts, in-depth interviews and daily encounters with neighborhood residents tell an intriguing story involving 'speaking in tongues,' rites of aggregation, and a moving pathos that is part of the historical circumstance of African-American life since slavery. It is powerful ethnography where outsiders are allowed into an often hidden world in plain sight. It is a fascinating account, thoughtful, and dynamic that deserves wide praise and should be read by all interested in life in the city.

Terry Williams, The New School for Social Research,
author of Crackhouse: Notes from the End of the Line


Peter Marina has achieved something quite rare in the annals of sociological ethnography. He has entered a community with which he had little in common and has told a compelling story about its innermost meanings, its organization, its cultural rituals and practices with the analytical deftness and observational acuity of an old hand. Yet this is Marina's first book! It is a wonderful accomplishment by an expert chronicler of the everyday among the urban poor. Read it and experience life in a house of worship as you've never seen it.

David Brotherton, John Jay College of Criminal Justice,
author of Banished to the Homeland: Dominican Deportees and Their Stories of Exile


Getting the Holy Ghost is a richly descriptive ethnography of an African American Pentecostal congregation in Brownsville, New York. Marina challenges the crisis model of religious conversion and instead argues that conversion is a life-long decision making process. Marina uses in-depth analysis of the conversion stories of ten participants, from pastors to recent converts, to make his case. While reading the life stories of these struggling Pentecostals, you 'll feel as if you know each of them personally.

Peter Althouse, Southeastern University


This four-year ethnographic study of a small African American church in Brooklyn, a revision of the author's PhD dissertation, is exceptionally well organized. Sociologist Marina highlights what he sees as "exotic" aspects of Pentecostal worship, and is most interested in the processes of religious conversion, which he relates to speaking in tongues. He uncovered tremendous diversity of opinion within church members' thoughts concerning glossolalia. Earlier researchers examined glossolalia as a form of altered states of consciousness, but Marina offers mainly sociological explanations and ultimately argues that church members understand tongue speaking primarily as a form of social empowerment. He also insightfully analyzes church organization, outlining the formal and informal structures of the Holy Ghost Church with attention to charismatic authority. Earlier studies of Pentecostalism predicted that church authority would become increasingly bureaucratic over time, but Marina convincingly argues that leaders in smaller Pentecostal congregations are better able to maintain their claims to charisma. The author's presentation is clear, his attention to ethnographic detail exemplary, and his scholarship sound. A significant contribution to the study of African American Pentecostalism. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries.

CHOICE

Getting the Holy Ghost makes significant contributions to our understanding of African-American Pentecostalism and to the sociological study of religious conversion. The author successfully highlights some of the tensions between traditional religion and the complexities of urban life . . . . [Getting the Holy Ghost] is an excellent study. Marina’s presentation is clear, his attention to ethnographic detail is exemplary, and his scholarship is thorough. Highly recommended.

— PentecoStudies

Marina’s dramatic narrative style mixed with sociological analysis is . . . enticing. . . .The results remain invaluable for a better understanding of the internal processes operative within individuals and congregations and the impact of the local on the global future of Pentecostalism.

— Religious Studies Review

Through a detailed and densely written observation of a small, non-denominational African/Caribbean Pentecostal church in Brooklyn, New York, Peter Marina. . . .aims to provide a thick and rich description of this church’s practices and beliefs, while it makes key theoretical interventions in the field of sociology of religion. . . .One of the strengths of the book lies particularly in these thick and detailed descriptions resulting from close participant observations that give us lively glimpses into ineffable events. . . .Marina succeeds in providing us with an intimate and in-depth look into this one particular Brooklyn Afro/Caribbean Pentecostal church. . . .The book is a valuable contribution to scholarship across a number of subfields. . . .The author is to be applauded for deftly weaving together a compelling story about this charismatic church through insightful personal observation with sophisticated theoretical interventions.

— Contemporary Sociology

All in all, this is a piece of work which is written with clarity and understanding, and which has the potential to bring clarity and understanding to those within both the academy and the church. As such I do not hesitate to recommend it. Even if sociology is not your thing, it is a gripping read.

The Pneuma Review July 26, 2015